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difficult intelligence environment to operate in after all, the russians have been so sort of nervous about western and in particular american presence in ukraine and other states on their borders. they threw out people from nonprofits and nongovernmental organizations that were providing sort of social support and democratic training and leadership training because they believe that they were age ents of the american government. nothing could be further from the truth. but it tells you something about this being a real tense environment. you go to all your technical means of intelligence. satellite, electronics surveillance. you be sure that all the assets of the u.s. government and our allies around the world are being used to understand military what the order of battle is, exactly what assets they're moving closer and into the crimea. but spider marks is quite right. this is an invasion. it is what it is. and to sort of threaten that in june we won't show up to the g 8 isn't really -- tells you we don't have a lot of leverage over the russian. let's remember the president and the white
in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving. >> and later on the, to the ice cometh. we'll take you where the flooding arrived. take a look at this. the flooding arrives in frozen form. a frozen river moving fast. we'll be right back. hey guys! sorry we're late. did you run into traffic? no, just had to stop by the house to grab a few things. you stopped by the house? uh-huh. yea. alright, whenever you get your stuff, run upstairs, get cleaned up for dinner. you leave the house in good shape? yea. yea, of course. ♪ [ sportscaster talking on tv ] last-second field go-- yea, sure ya did. [ male announcer ] introducing at&t digital life. personalized home security and automation. get professionally monitored security for just $29.99 a month. with limited availability in select markets. ♪ witmarge: you know, there's in a more enjoyable way to get your fiber. try phillips fiber good gummies. they're delicious, and a good source of fiber to help support regularity. wife: mmmm husband: these are good! marge: the tasty side of fiber. from phillips. save you fifteen percent or
, look, in a hyper partisan environment where he has to run for re-election, an issue like this can be polarized. any issue around race, as you know, wolf, sends people to their full rise corners. the last thing the president wants to do when he's running for re-election is to have a country more polarized. i think the beauty of this time now is you can have more risky conversations that are important for moving this country forward right now in his second term. so i'm thankful that he did. >> i want to play another excerpt from the president's powerful speech. cornell and don, both of you listen to this. >> no excuses. government and philanthropy, faith-based communities, we've got to help you knock down some of the barriers that you experience. that's what we're here for. but you've got responsibilities, too. and i know you can meet the challenge. many of you already are, if you make the effort. it may be hard, but you will have to reject the cynicism that the circumstances of your birth or societies injustices necessarily defines you and your future. it will take courage but you'
environment today, even a small business has to spend $20,000 to $30,000 just complying with the 2800 regulations we layered on them federally let alone the state and local. you know, erin, i invest in small businesses every week. what's what i do. you should have these people talk to you. or even better still, let the president talk to somebody running a 17-person business in massachusetts or 30 employees in california. and hear what they say. they would not agree with him. and i think that is the core and the essence of america that we're not listening to. we need to listen to these people. they should tell us what to do. what they want right now is less government. >> thank you very much. i remember, by the way, the president saying he was going to go back and cut a whole lot of regulations. there was a big push for that. when you say 2800 on average, i'm going to assume you know your stats on that. that's horrific. that's probably something you could agree with the president on, too. still to come, a controversial bill some say is anti-gay in front of arizona's governor tonight. w
experts say that's possible. but what if something in the environment is the culprit. state health officials have found nothing so far. you would think they would be working around the clock trying to find an answer talking to every single mom who's lost a baby. they're not and outrage is growing. here's senior correspondent elizabeth cohen. >> reporter: in the rural and fertile yakima valley, an alarming number of babies born with birth defects. anencephaly, babies born with much of their brain and skull missing. >> i was stunned. three in a couple month period of time. that's unheard of. they are such tragic, terrible outcomes. >> reporter: barron's shocking discovery prompted an investigation by the state health department, which showed that in three counties in a three-year period there were 23 cases of anencephaly, a rate four times the national average. what could be causing such a high rate here? is it just a coincidence or something more serious? this epidemiologist at the washington state health department conducted the investigation. >> did you find an answer? >> we have
, this is a different environment. ukraine's far different. we never got involved militarily in georgia, but there were limited options we had like bringing the best georgian troops back to fight the russians. >> you did have george w. bush face a similar situation. you don't think he should have gone in militarily, aggressively start some war. this president is not doing this. i don't understand how the critique is -- wouldn't you agree the president is handling this situation as it hits his desk right now, appropriately? >> i think we can't go to war. that's very clear. there's no military option here. so i've tried to stand with the administration and say in congress tomorrow we're going to talk about sanctions. eliot's done a good job leading that with ed royce. i think we need to take the fact that america in 2020 will be the leading world energy producer, so let's talk about that being used to be an offset to the russians because their energy is their weapon. if we're looking to make russia a pariah state, that's where the president needs to be talking. >> listen, i think there's a lot to be said
changing the entire arc of their day and creating healthy environments for kids from morning to night. and i think with those small changes we're starting to make some progress. >> reporter: and some of the changes that first lady brought up this week during one of her speeches was that now big chain restaurants are offering more healthy menu, separate menus of healthy option. organizations are planting gardens at schools. she also said that water has now surpassed soda as the most consumed beverage in america. you saw the vice president and the president taking a sip of water at the end of that work out. and so water she says is now surpassing soda. those are some of the changes that the first lady mentions coming out of this four year old campaign. one other bit of news is very young children, obesity rates among very young children 2 to 5 have dropped 43% in the past decade. they are not attributing it directly to the let's move campaign but this is the good news the first lady is hoping we'll see more of. >> i'm sure we'll see more of michele obama dancing with eggplants. athena j
to provide colors and space that mean something, you need to provide an environment that will inspire them to do their best work. ♪ >> a little help from my friends. i'm going to present the award for costume design. >> for me to hand out an award for clothes, don't get me wrong, i'm going to do it, but i'm not exactly sure they came up with the right fellow. >> there was a time when every woman wanted to dress like garbo. clark gable took his shirt off in "it happened one night" and it took 18 years for brando to bring the t-shirt back. >>> the nominees -- >> in best achievement for film editing -- >> they are -- ♪ >>> for best original score -- [ applause ] >> the winner is -- [ applause ] >> i would like to thank -- [ speaking foreign language ] [ applause ] >> the cinematographer takes people who look like this and try to turn them into this. >> the actors like to say a good cameraman photographs our face. a great one our souls. ♪ ♪ >> if you think of "saving private ryan," all the glossy, technically perfect imagery was thrown away for the sake of creating images that would ma
environment, policies are changing in this country in terms of the consumption of food. the importance of feeding kids a healthy breakfast. michaela, i'm not sure if you know this. let me tell you this. children who consume a healthy breakfast and who are physically active for a minimum of 30 minutes a day perform higher on mathematical tests up to 17% higher. they excel in reading. in many cases, they read at a great level higher. we call that the learning connection. the impact that eating healthy and being physically active has on performance, behavior, attendance. so my response back to you is, let's make sure we find ways for kids to be active before, during, and after the school day. as parents, it is our responsibility to make sure we are talking to our school administrators. we are making sure our kids are not going hungry when they walk into the school building and much of what the first lady is doing is making sure the kids get the proper nutrients that they can get in the school building at a minimum. >> alexis glick, thank you so much for this. you can hear the passion in h
with the veterans' bill. that's the simple truth. what i hope very much is in this extremely partisan environment the fact that we have a congress that is virtually dysfunctional. i would hope that on this issue of supporting those people who sacrifice so much for their country, supporting their families that we could for this moment, at least, rise above this absurd level of partisanship. and i hope that we will. i hope we can get some republican support for the bill. >> one final question, senator. assuming the iran sanctions part is stripped out and not part of the bill, there are some oh who are worried about the cost of these expanded benefits for u.s. military veterans, health benefits, education benefits, social service benefits, all sorts of other benefits. and they say the country can't afford that right now. to which your reply is? >> if you can't afford to take care of your veterans, don't go to war. these people are bearing the brunt of what war is about. we have a moral obligation to support them. >> simple answer to the point. senator, thanks very much for coming in. you'll keep us
in jungles and those kind of environments. that's why i made "survivor." "apprentice" i love the idea of american business. so i've got a lot of things i like to do. in the cable of "the baseball" and "son of god" it's our faith, something really serious to us. but i think the best i can say to viewers watching this right now, anybody tells you they've got it all figured out are out of their minds or lying. you can only have a little bit figured out and go forward anyway and believe and have faith it will work out. the people who need to be 100% sure down the do anything, piers. you know that. >> the people who rejected "the bible" miniseries, you must have bumped into some of them later. they must be kicking themselves all over hollywood, aren't they? >> they are. or they've sort of gotten over it now. it was last year. they were. i'm not going to give any names. same people you know. and we're all collegiate. again the pat on the back and said i missed that one. i thought you were out of your mind. i can't believe you had that many viewers. but we're all collegiate. when "son of god
was nowhere around, nowhere near her and it was a very protected environment. this is very far from what a town hall in new hampshire, iowa, or any of the early primary states look like and, frankly, i was struck sitting there by how much measured, how cautious she was and the fact that she doesn't connect with young people nearly to the same level that her husband did or that barack obama does. they would have had that room vibrating. i found it quite inspirational. >> interesting to hear that. and that may play into what we're going to hear from glenn rush. you wrote an article that went off in "politico" overnight, a really, really interesting profile of joe biden. he sat down with him, interviewed him on an amtrack train. and you heard about this retreat that was attended by all sorts of joe biden insiders. and they went to this retreat and the people with joe biden came out saying this. you wrote this. the others at the biden retreat came away feeling that clinton would ultimately decide not to run. but insiders telling you they believe biden -- that hillary clinton would decide not
of a father in young african-american families, especially in urban environments. but i think it's inescapable that he was more retiscent on these issues in the first term than in the second term. again, there are reasons for that and you don't want to be seen as the african-american president. you want to be seen as the president of the united states but i think we are seeing a certain freedom that the president is expressing today in terms of what he wants to talk about, don. >> reporter: are you talking to me? >> yeah. >> reporter: jake, he is the african-american president. he's an african-american president. he's a president of all people but, again, he has a responsibility as president to help everyone but he is a black man. and as i said, he understands the issues that we as african-americans face more than any other president that we have had they used to call bill clinton the first black president just for fun but, yes, i think he has more of a freedom. listen, in his first term he didn't do that much about gay rights and gay marriage and it started to happen in the second term. he ha
myself in these young men. and the only difference is that i grew up in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving. >> the new initiative that the president is launching is called my brother's keeper. founations and businesses that now pledge to donate $200 million over five years to aid young men of color. much more on that amount of money and whether it's significant or not with tavis smily in a few minutes. but don lemon was in the room as the president spoke. don, what more did the president say? he usually doesn't get so personal. he's rather insulated and rather removed. this was a very different man we saw today. >> he's been criticized at times and it was a very different man we saw today. very emotional man. he was very candid. and many said, you know what, it's about time. today, quite frankly, many will say that barack obama became the black president today. he became a president who is african-american, obviously, but he became the person that many people wanted him to be. many of those who criticized him. what they wanted to hear from him. they wanted him to say so
in these young men. and the only difference is that i kbru up in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving. >> congressman elijah cummings joining us right now, a democratic congressman from maryland. i know you were there in the east room of the white house, congressman. take us inside for you personally what was it like to hear the president really express these kinds of emotions? >> i tell you, it made me feel emotional, wolf, as an african-american man who was once an african-american boy. and to see those young men standing there. but the fact is that not only did the presidency himself in those boys, wolf, he allowed those boys to see themselves in him. and that is very, very critical. and that's the part that's been missing. we've got a president who has been elevated to where he is. but a lot of those young boys probably felt at some time this was unreachable. by him allowing himself to be seen, that is, to strip himself and let them know that he had been through what they had been through, i think is made a tremendous difference. as a matter of fact, one of the young boy
myself in these young men. i grew up in an environment that was a little more forgiving. when i was their age, i was a lot like them. i didn't have a dad in the house. i was angry about it even though i didn't necessarily realize it at the time. i made bad choices. i got high without always thinking about the harm that it could do. groups that have had the odds stacked against them in unique ways that require unique solutions. groups have seen fewer opportunities that have spanned generations. the worst part is, we have become numb to these statistics. we're not surprised by them. we take them as the norm. we assume this is an inevitable part of american life instead of the outrage that it is. the continuing struggles of boys and young men are falling by the wayside, dropping out, involved in negative behavior. we need to change the statistics, not just for the sake of the young men and boys but for the sake of america's future. that's why in the aftermath of the trayvon martin verdict, with all the emotions and controversy, i spoke about the need to bolster and reinforce our yo
different? >> no. it's the same environment. everything is the same. just -- like i said before, 12 years in the nba, not a problem, not an issue. year 13, not a problem, not an issue. same old, same old. >> that's it for me. i'm brooke baldwin. "the lead with jake tapper" starts right now. >>> the white house warns russia not to do what russia may have already started doing. i'm jake tapper. this is "the lead." the world lead. it's playing out like a tom changes see thriller. ousted ukrainian president viktor yanukovych breaks his silence and vows to fight for his country's future as russian troops are spotted. the politics lead. flashback friday. withheld pages from the clinton presidency is released and shines new light on hillary clinton. >>> and the buried lead. actor seth rogen calls out washington, d.c., for not calling out something that is important. seth rogen live on "the lead" today. good afternoon, everyone. i'm jake tapper. we're going to begin, of course, with the world lead and armed men who may be tied to the russian military who have seized control of two airports
redistricting has made almost every seat safe from the national political environment. but what it does talk about is just the overall mood and the mood right now is favoring republicans. that generic ballot traditionally is more supportive of democrats. there are more people who are registered as democrats in this country or who identify as democrats. >> which a 4 point lead for republicans that translates into big numbers of seats in like red or purplish states. if you are in arkansas or in alaska, louisiana, north carolina, places where the senate is resting, that four-point lead looks like a ten-point republican lead and that's bad news. >> going back to 2010, a big republican sweep in the house, i believe the generic ballots were relatively close. >> but if you go back to 2006 -- >> right. >> last time democrats won control at this point in the cycle, nobody thought that democrats were going to be able to take control of the house. i think it's still very early and the best that democrats can do is what they're doing. where they're recruiting good candidates your raising republicans qua
. but it is a different environment fundamentally from any other kind of dealing with putin. one has to understand where he is right now. his policy initiatives have been very rash. you don't do what he does unless you think the stakes are very high and in his view i think he believes the political forces out of this recent political crisis has now led yukraine to position where russia is losing it to the eu and nato and he believes that's happened in part if not engineered by the u.s. and the eu and others then strongly supported by it and come to have an exceedingly negative view of the administration, of the americans and it will be very hard to do any kind of a deal with him where you get back to the clinton proposition to trust him on a deal. we're in a different world with putin right now. >> okay. but let me ask you this. madeline albright called him delusional. is he completely delusional in reading the country with a country on the doorstep, right on the border? is he delusional or is he right to be quite paranoid about the situation and in his own way he believes acting in the best entrust of
environment that's eroding your blood vefls, causing diabetes, blood pressure issues. these are things we know. >> dr. montgomery thank you so much for your insight. we appreciate it. >> my pleasure. >> all new next hour of "newsroom" deadline drawing for yaz's governor. she's feeling pressure to veto a bill that would give businesses the right to turn away customers. >> i ask you why you supported it? >> no thanks. >> randy didn't stop there. she goes in search of answers in the next hour of "newsroom". who feel like there's a brick on their face. who are so congested, it feels like the walls are closing in. ♪ who are so stuffed up, they feel like they're under water. try zyrtec-d® to powerfully clear your blocked nose and relieve your other allergy symptoms... so you can breathe easier all day. zyrtec-d®. find it at the pharmacy counter. zyrtec-d®. ameriprise asked people a simple question: in retirement, will you outlive your money? uhhh. no, that can't happen. that's the thing, you don't know how long it has to last. everyone has retirement questions. so ameriprise created the exclusi
difference is that i grew up in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving. when i was their age, i was a lot like them. i didn't have ad in the house. and i was angry about it even though i didn't necessarily realize it at the time. i made bad choices. i got high without always thinking about the harm that it could do. groups that have had the odds stacked against them in unique ways that require unique solutions. groups who've seen fewer opportunities that have spanned generations. the worst part is that we become numb to these statistics. we're not surprised by them. we take them as the norm. we just assume this is an inevitable part of american life instead of the outrage that it is. [ applause ] >> and i -- and i believe the continuing struggles of so many boys and young men, the fact that too many of them are falling by the way side, dropping out, unemployed, involved in negative behavior, being pro filed. so we need to change the statistics. not just for the sake of the young men and boys, but for the sake of america's future. and that's -- that's why in the aftermath of the
the environment was going to be like in the jail. he was very helpful. he came with me. and just every step i took towards the room. i remembered every thing that happened on february 20th. i was in so much pain. i had memories of my son. we walked in the room and i face the wall because at that moment, i was still thinking whether i really wanted to face this man or not. the minute they told me he entered the room, i turned around and i did not know what was going to happen. the minute i saw him and i looked so close to his eyes, i saw the evil in him. i saw no remorse and i saw that he was not really sorry. i wanted to tell him in person what my son goes through every day. >> what does your son go through every day? you told us every day you watch your son die. every morning you rush to your son's side because why? >> we live moment by moment with my son because he can suddenly just get sick. he doesn't give a sign that he is going to get sick, but he can get sick to the point where his oxygen drops. we have time to rush him to the er. we call the ambulance to take him to the er. every day my so
is that i grew up in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving. so when i made a mistake, the consequences were not as severe. i had people who encouraged me and not just my mom and grandparents, but teachers and community leaders. they pushed me to work hard and study hard and make the most of myself. if i didn't listen, they said it again. if i didn't listen, they said it a third time and they would give me second chances and third chances. they never gave up on me. so i didn't give up on myself. i told these young men my story then and i repeat it now because i firmly believe that every child deserves the same chances that i had. that's why we are here today. to do what we can in this year of action to give more young americans the support they need to make good choices. to be resilient and overcome obstacles. achieve their dreams. this is an issue of national importance. this is as important as any issue that i work on. it's an issue that goes to the very heart of why i ran for president. because if america stands for anything, it stands for the idea of opportunity fo
in the locker room. have you noticed anything different? >> no. it's the same environment. everything is the same. just -- like i said before, 12 years in the nba, not a problem, not an issue. year 13, not a problem, not an issue. same old, same old. >> that's it for me. i'm brooke baldwin. "the lead with jake tapper" starts right now. >>> the white house warns russia not to do what russia may have already started doing. i'm jake tapper. this is "the lead." the world lead. it's playing out like a tom changes see thriller. ousted ukrainian president viktor yanukovych breaks his silence and vows to fight for his country's future as russian troops are spotted. the politics lead. flashback friday. withheld pages from the clinton presidency is released and shines new light onla
an already tense environment. robert siri will travel to geneva today where he will brief the secretary general on his mission to ukraine and discuss further possible steps. the secretary general is gravely concerned that the situation has further deteriorated since yesterday's meeting of the council. in this regard, let me reiterate the secretary general's important messages conveyed in his statement of today. and i quote, "the secretary general continues to closely follow the seriously and rapidly unfolding events in ukraine, including developments in crimea, and is gravely concerned about the deterioration of the situation. the secretary general reiterates his call for the full respect for and preservation of the independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity of ukraine. he calls for an immediate restoration of calm and direct dialogue between all concerned to solve the current crisis. the secretary general will be speaking with president vladimir putin of russia shortly about the situation in ukraine" unquote. let me say in closing, at this crucial moment it is important to rec
explained to them was i had issues, too, when i was their age. i just had an environment that was a little more forgiving so when i screwed up, the consequences weren't as high as when kids on the south side screw up. >> valerie jarrett is the president's senior adviser. >> in a brief interaction, he transformed many of their lives and touched their hearts as they did him. and so just imagine if we can do that all around the country. >> reporter: this afternoon, the b.a.m. teens are at the white house for the announcement of the my brother's keeper initiative. they'll donate at least $200 million over five years to programs like b.a.m. nationwide. >> sdwhwhat does becoming a man mean? >> it means it's time to grow up, leave all childish things aside. >> becoming a man means become a man basically. you know, stop being childish. persevere. >> same thing what these two said. take responsibility and deal with your things. deal with your actions and whatever outcome is you have to accept it. >> an outcome hopefully of change for a troubled generation. for a troubled generation. let's hope the
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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